User interfaces

  • November 7, 2010

    Linux's KDE defines themes that set the color scheme and style for window frames, tabs, buttons, and other components drawn by KDE's Qt user interface toolkit. For Java applications, changing the theme should set colors in Java's java.awt.SystemColor objects, which applications may use to customize their user interfaces to match the current theme. Unfortunately, there are some problems here.

    This article discusses SystemColor problems with KDE, and provides color swatches, RGB/HSV values, and downloadable color lists for the default SystemColors on Linux.

  • July 3, 2010

    Both Mac themes and all eight user-selectable highlight colors set the color scheme for window title bars, buttons, check boxes, and other user interface components. For Java applications, changing the theme also sets colors in Java's java.awt.SystemColor objects, which applications may use to customize their user interfaces to match the current theme.

    This article discusses SystemColor problems on Macs, and provides color swatches, RGB/HSV values, and downloadable color lists for all SystemColors for the standard Mac theme and highlight colors.

  • March 7, 2010

    Each Windows Vista theme sets the desktop image, screen saver, sound set, mouse pointer shapes, and color scheme for window frames, buttons, scroll bars, and all other user interface components. For Java applications, changing the theme also sets colors in Java's java.awt.SystemColor objects, which applications may use to customize user interfaces to match the Windows theme.

    This article discusses SystemColor problems on Windows Vista, and provides color swatches, RGB/HSV values, and downloadable color lists for all SystemColors for each of the standard Windows Vista themes.

  • May 9, 2010

    Each Windows XP theme sets the desktop image, screen saver, and color scheme for window frames, buttons, scrollbars, and other user interface components. For Java applications, changing the theme also sets colors in Java's java.awt.SystemColor objects, which applications may use to customize user interfaces to match the Windows theme.

    This article discusses SystemColor problems on Windows XP, and provides color swatches, RGB/HSV values, and downloadable color lists for SystemColors for each of the standard Windows XP themes.

  • August 21, 2008

    Java's Swing components have a constant background color used to fill the entire component area. To add interest, contrast, and polish to a user interface, override the component's background painting and add a gradient to smoothly vary the color across the background. This tip shows how and demonstrates the effect.

  • December 13, 2008

    File and folder icons are an important part of the look and feel of the Mac. These icons are available to Java applications through several different classes in Swing and sometimes as UI defaults for Apple's "Mac OS X" look and feel. This article shows to how to get at these icons using Java on a Mac.

  • December 6, 2008

    Part of the Mac look and feel is the use of standard icons across many applications, like the color wheel for the color picker, or the gear for advanced settings. To promote uniformity across Mac applications, Apple provides these icons via their NSImage class in the AppKit toolkit for Objective C. This article shows how to get at these same standard icons using Java on a Mac.

  • January 10, 2009

    The Mac automatically adds a Mac-style window frame to all Java windows, but there is more that you can do to make sure Java windows look and feel right on a Mac. This article discusses Swing settings and Mac-specific client properties to control the appearance of window decorations on a Mac.

  • March 28, 2009

    Grouping together related components helps organize a user interface and make it easier to learn and use. Java provides several border styles for outlining groups, but none of them match the Mac's recessed style. This article shows how to create a recessed border using special UI defaults available to Mac Java applications.

  • November 22, 2008

    Java's Swing has just one generic notion of a button and just one look for that button. However, Apple's Aqua user interface for the Mac has about a dozen different button types to build stand-alone buttons and bars of adjacent segmented buttons. Each Aqua button type has a specific use, from the purple ? button for help, to glossy OK/Cancel/Open/Save buttons, and recessed scope buttons used to modify search operations. This article shows how to use Apple's "Mac OS X" look and feel for Java to access these hidden button types using Java on a Mac.

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