November, 2008

  • November 22, 2008

    Java's Swing has just one generic notion of a button and just one look for that button. However, Apple's Aqua user interface for the Mac has about a dozen different button types to build stand-alone buttons and bars of adjacent segmented buttons. Each Aqua button type has a specific use, from the purple ? button for help, to glossy OK/Cancel/Open/Save buttons, and recessed scope buttons used to modify search operations. This article shows how to use Apple's "Mac OS X" look and feel for Java to access these hidden button types using Java on a Mac.

  • November 15, 2008

    The default size of Java's Swing components feels large and clunky when building tightly-packed user interfaces for Mac tool palettes, inspectors, ribbons, and info windows. Beneath Swing, however, Apple's Aqua user interface for the Mac includes predefined smaller component sizes designed explicitly for tightly-packed control panels. This article shows how to use Apple's "Mac OS X" look and feel for Java to create these hidden smaller components using Java on a Mac.

  • November 8, 2008

    Each Swing look and feel has a long list of User Interface Defaults (UI defaults) used to initialize Java components with default fonts, colors, icons, borders, and more. You can get and set these defaults to tune your application's overall appearance. This article shows how to use these defaults and surveys the principal look and feels for Java on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux, to create a long list of the names and data types for their many UI defaults.

Syndicate content
Nadeau software consulting
Nadeau software consulting